Program

Symposia and Workshops

 

Sunday

Workshop: Dairy Records Analysis

Workshop: Dairy Records Analysis

ADSA Graduate Student Division Symposium: Thesis and Dissertation Writing Workshop

ADSA Graduate Student Division Symposium: Thesis and Dissertation Writing Workshop

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Vernetta Williams, Cultivate the Writer Thesis and Dissertation Writing with Dr. Vernetta Williams
NANP Nutrition Models Workshop

NANP Nutrition Models Workshop

The National Animal Nutrition Program (NANP) Nutrition Models Workshop will use lectures and exercises to illustrate how mathematical models are constructed, evaluated, and applied towards problems in animal nutrition. The workshop will give attendees a basic fluency in mathematical modeling and, in so doing, advance their use of models in nutrition research.

Program

Lectures are 30 min, and exercises are 60 min

  • Welcoming remarks (Tim Hackmann, University of California, Davis)
  • Tutorial on R
    • Speaker: Veridiana Daley (Land O’Lakes)
    • Objectives
      • Ensure R statistical software is correctly installed on attendee laptops
      • Walk through basic data manipulation, visualization, and other functions
  • Model construction: lecture
    • Speaker: Tim Hackmann (University of California, Davis)
    • Objectives
      • Discuss history of modeling and role in research
      • Distinguish between different types of models (deterministic vs. static, etc.)
      • Walk through steps of constructing a dynamic, deterministic model
        • Write a model using a conceptual diagram
        • Translate a model diagram into set of differential equations
        • Explain different approaches for solving model equations
  • Model construction: exercises
    • Speaker: Tim Hackmann (University of California, Davis)
    • Objectives
      • Speaker constructs a model of rumen fermentation from first principles using
        • Excel
        • R
  • Meta-analysis: lecture
    • Speaker: Veridiana Daley (Land O’Lakes)
    • Objectives
      • Explain the theory and motivation of a meta-analysis
  • Meta-analysis: exercises
    • Speaker: Veridiana Daley (Land O’Lakes)
    • Objectives
      • Speaker shows meta-analysis with example dataset
      • Attendees conduct own meta-analysis with second dataset and R script
  • Lunch
  • Model evaluation: lecture
    • Speaker: Henk van Lingen (University of California, Davis)
    • Objectives
      • Identify strength, weakness, and relevance of different evaluation statistics (e.g., R2, CCC, RMSPE)
      • Explain procedure and utility of sensitivity analysis
  • Model evaluation: exercises
    • Speaker: Henk van Lingen (University of California, Davis)
    • Objectives
      • Speaker conducts an evaluation with example dataset and R script
      • Attendees conduct own evaluation with a second example dataset
  • The Dairy NRC model: lecture
    • Speaker: Mark Hanigan (Virginia Tech)
    • Objectives
      • Review major features and updates to Dairy NRC
  • The Dairy NRC model: exercises
    • Speaker: Mark Hanigan (Virginia Tech)
    • Objectives
      • Walk though Dairy NRC model
      • Attendees formulate a diet
  • Closing remarks (Tim Hackmann, University of California, Davis)

Monday AM

Breeding and Genetics Symposium: Genetic and Genomic Selection Goals in 2020—An Overview

Breeding and Genetics Symposium: Genetic and Genomic Selection Goals in 2020—An Overview

In this symposium, we will discuss who decides what to breed for on a national scale (e.g., public, industry, or political pressures), what we are breeding for (e.g., weighting, traits, economics), and why we are composing our breeding strategies the way we are. This symposium will highlight the development of breeding strategies in all dairy breeds and its impact, and especially look to new developments and future scenarios.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Henk Bovenhuis, Wageningen University Genes that alter milk proteins and their marketability
Cees-Jam Hollander, Danone Dairy processors’ views on milk marketing and the rise of alternative milk —Can genetics help?
Laurel Mastro, Neogen The genetics of milk composition that are on your genomic test result, their marketability, and which ones are in the pipeline (A3)
Jay Matheson, DHIA The importance and future of DHIA for altering and marketing the milk of the future
Derek Bickhart, ARS/USDA It’s not just your cows’ genetics that impact milk—Effect of the microbiome’s DNA on milk composition
Extension Education Symposium: Social Media Influencers—Facts and Fiction About Consumers and the Dairy Community

Extension Education Symposium: Social Media Influencers—Facts and Fiction About Consumers and the Dairy Community

Today’s consumers are very different than they used to be yet they have a strong interest in where their food comes from, including how food animals are raised and handled. Social media influencers may or may not rely on science but do use feelings and emotions to share their stories and opinions. Social media influencers are lacking in production agriculture, and those that do exist use science (facts) and typically don’t use feelings and emotions. To help build consumer trust in dairy products, this symposium will provide information about the role of social media influencers, how they drive consumer trends, and the opportunities for the dairy community.

Dairy Foods Symposium: Reducing Dairy Food Loss and Waste

Dairy Foods Symposium: Reducing Dairy Food Loss and Waste

Food loss and waste is a significant global problem, with nearly one-third of the world’s food supply, approximately 1.3 billion tons, lost or wasted every year. Dairy foods have one of the highest rates of food loss and waste, with 20% lost or wasted globally and just over 30% lost or wasted in the United States. The impacts of these losses are widespread, with economic, environmental, and nutritional consequences. The dairy industry must take steps to combat food loss and waste throughout the production-to-consumer continuum. In this symposium, we explore the effects of dairy food loss and waste on our industry and consumers and discuss strategies to reduce this loss and waste throughout the dairy continuum.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Stephanie Clark, Iowa State University Household waste resulting from consumer confusion
Nicole Martin, Cornell University Controlling spoilage to reduce food loss and waste in dairy foods
Christina Campbell, Iowa State University, and Gretchen Henningsen, Iowa State University The role of consumers in dairy food loss and waste
Juan Guzman, Capro-X Novel solutions for valorization of dairy waste
Melissa Martinelli Dairy industry opportunities through waste reduction
Animal Behavior and Well-Being Symposium: Translating Animal Welfare Science—Animal Experiences, Dairy Production Implications, and Societal Viewpoints

Animal Behavior and Well-Being Symposium: Translating Animal Welfare Science—Animal Experiences, Dairy Production Implications, and Societal Viewpoints

Despite scientific advances that drive an increasing ability to understand animal experiences across species, there is a divide between our ability to implement and support management changes that improve dairy cattle welfare on-farm and our consideration and understanding of societal viewpoints. In this symposium, we propose to bring together different viewpoints on (1) basic research to measure animal emotions, (2) applied approaches to improve welfare within typical dairy production settings, and (3) societal viewpoints on dairy animal welfare. We aim to draw, in part, on expertise outside dairy cattle to provide novel viewpoints, and include speakers who can provide a global perspective. The symposium will include a panel discussion to stimulate debate and reflection on the future of animal agriculture, in consideration of these various viewpoints on animal welfare.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Tina Horback, UC Davis Animal experiences, emotions, and welfare
Jeremy Merchant-Forde, USDA-ARS Applications of animal welfare science and global dairy production implications
Jen Walker, Danone How do we humanely feed a hungry world? Supply chain challenges and solutions and what it means to dairy farmers
Jeremy Marchant-Forde, USDA-ARS  
CSAS Symposium: Milk Synthesis

CSAS Symposium: Milk Synthesis

Over the past decade, the dairy research community has been expanding our knowledge on mechanisms that control the regulation of milk fat and protein synthesis. Recent research has demonstrated that milk protein yield does not respond according to the limiting substrate phenomenon and that extra-mammary organs may play a role in arterial amino acid concentrations and mammary blood flow. Furthermore, research has begun to uncover the mammary metabolic response to dietary fat supplementation, including the balance between de novo fatty acid synthesis and the uptake of preformed fatty acids. These findings, along with an abundance of research regarding the role of nutrition, molecular regulation, and cellular signaling pathways on the regulation of these components, have significant implications for influencing milk fat and protein synthesis and concentrations. As dairy producers are paid according to the composition of raw milk components, most notably milk fat and protein, research demonstrating potential avenues to optimize the regulation of these components is of increasing importance to the North American dairy industry. Therefore, the aim of the symposium is to highlight new developments in the regulation of milk fat and protein synthesis in the lactating dairy cow and to focus on the main factors that regulate the synthesis of major milk components.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
John Cant, University of Guelph Title TBD
Helene Lapierre, Agrifood Canada Title TBD
Rachel Gervais, Laval University Title TBD
Kelly Nichols, Wageningen University (the Netherlands) Title TBD

Monday PM

Forages and Pastures Symposium: Linking Forage Quality to Herd Productivity

Forages and Pastures Symposium: Linking Forage Quality to Herd Productivity

Forage quality makes up the majority of the diet in most dairy animals. In fact, a trend over the past 20 years of using more highly digestible forage hybrids has resulted in greater adoption of higher forage diets without sacrificing productivity. Often, it is a challenge to make the leap from seeing responses in a research setting and observing similar observations in field settings, where the environment is not controlled. The objective of this symposium is present the responses of forage quality in a controlled setting, determine predictability of how controlled research corresponds with field responses, and how to connect the two areas.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
John Goeser, Rock River Laboratories Connecting forage data to on-farm performance
Kathy Soder, USDA-ARS Predicting dairy cattle performance on pasture-based programs
Paul Kononoff, University of Nebraska Physical characteristics of forages and impact on animal performance
Alex Hristov, Pennsylvania State University Methane production in relation to animal performance
Dairy Foods Symposium: The Future of Probiotics

Dairy Foods Symposium: The Future of Probiotics

Dairy foods have long been vehicles for delivery of probiotics to consumers. This symposium will highlight some of the new issues related to probiotics. First, there is significant interest in probiotics other than lactic acid bacteria or bifidobacteria. Second, momentum is building to reorganize the Lactobacillus genus, which will result in many new genus names for currently popular probiotics. Third, some high-profile studies have cast doubt on probiotics and these are worthy of discussion. Finally, it would be interesting to hear from the Gates Foundation regarding their desire to use probiotics in the developing world.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Michael Ganzle, University of Alberta Lactobacillus taxonomy and impact on industry
Maria Marco, UC Davis How dairy impacts probiotic function
J. P. van Pijkeren, Lawson Health Research Institute Facts versus fiction with probiotics
TBD Global applications of novel probiotics
Special Session: Current Hot Topics in Dairy—Drivers of Strategy

Special Session: Current Hot Topics in Dairy—Drivers of Strategy

Although not every dairy scientist is expected to be an expert on every dairy-related topic or issue, every dairy scientist is a communicator. This special session will provide an overview of “hot topics” facing the dairy industry to arm ADSA attendees with current information they need to put the hype into context.

Special Session: FASS Scientific Policy Committee—Advocating for Science Policy and Funding

Special Session: FASS Scientific Policy Committee—Advocating for Science Policy and Funding

Actions, or lack thereof, in Washington, DC, and in state capitols have a major impact on the future of agricultural research and education. Animal agriculture’s voice is too often missing when decisions are made. It is critical that researchers, educators, and the users of agricultural research speak out to help define research priorities as they advocate for needed legislation and research funding. This special session will help people better understand the current status of research funding and priority setting. It will highlight what organizations and individuals can do and are doing to support action in these areas. Topics will include a review of agriculture research provisions of the 2018 Farm Bill; agriculture research funding in the FY20 budget; status and impact of the USDA relocation on research; and opportunities for input by animal scientists.

Ruminant Nutrition Platform Session: Fat and Lipid Metabolism

Ruminant Nutrition Platform Session: Fat and Lipid Metabolism

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Kevin Harvatine, Penn State University Recap of 36th Discover Conference on Lipids in Dairy Nutrition

Tuesday AM

Breeding and Genetics Symposium: Not Just Another Liquid—The Genetics of Milk

Breeding and Genetics Symposium: Not Just Another Liquid—The Genetics of Milk

In this symposium, we will highlight and stress the properties of milk that can be altered using genetic and genomic approaches (e.g., A2 milk, fatty acid profiles, use of mid-infrared technology) and discuss payment schemes and retailer/consumer perspectives on such alterations. This symposium will focus on the development of this implementation in all dairy breeds, its impact, and especially look to new developments and future scenarios.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Chuck Sattler, Select Sires Genetic and genomic evaluation from a stud farm’s perspective
Sophie Eaglen, National Association of Animal Breeders Export of semen and the effect of foreign markets on breeding programs
Joao Durr, Council on Dairy Cattle Breeding What are we breeding for?
John Cole, ARS/USDA A future perspective on selection decisions and breeding programs
Mike Coffey, Scotland’s Rural College The future of phenomics
Dairy Foods Symposium: Nourish to Flourish—The Role of Product, Process, and Package in Driving Milk Consumption Among Children

Dairy Foods Symposium: Nourish to Flourish—The Role of Product, Process, and Package in Driving Milk Consumption Among Children

Milk intake from the school breakfast program and the national school lunch program accounts for >75% of daily milk intake among children from 5 to 18 years old. This highlights the importance of these programs in driving fluid milk consumption in children. Fluid milk is one of the major contributors to dietary calcium and vitamin D in the diets of children, and its consumption is an important factor that influences their overall nourishment. Increasing fluid milk consumption among children is important because milk consumption is a behavioral trait that continues into adulthood and could stop the steady decline in fluid milk consumption among adolescents. The National Dairy Council is sponsoring this symposium reviewing the latest research and insights to drive milk consumption among children.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
David Barbano, Cornell University US school lunch and breakfast programs: Ensuring dairy’s place at the table
MaryAnne Drake, North Carolina State University Characterizing child preferences for milk fat content in white and chocolate milk
Helene Hopfer, Penn State University Optimizing acceptability of sugar- and sodium-reduced chocolate milk via cross-modal interactions for two different consumer segments
Timothy Lott, Cornell University Predicting the impact of the school milk distribution chain and processing factors on the quality of school milk using Monte Carlo simulations
Scott Dissinger, Dairy Management Inc. The role of school channel and youth in driving dairy consumption and reducing waste: Case studies
Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Understanding Fiber Digestion and Applications for Diet Formulation

Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Understanding Fiber Digestion and Applications for Diet Formulation

Lactation Biology Symposium: Mammary Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses During Involution and Disease

Lactation Biology Symposium: Mammary Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses During Involution and Disease

The mammary gland is a modified skin gland and therefore plays a role in the innate immune system; moreover, the adaptive immune response is important during involution and mastitis. Understanding the role of each of these arms of the immune system and their interaction will enable development of management strategies that enhance welfare and production of the dairy cow.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Olga Wellnitz, University of Bern The role of the blood–milk barrier and its manipulation for the efficacy of the mammary immune response
Lorraine Sordillo, Michigan State University Effect of lipid mediators on mammary gland inflammation and oxidative stress during health and disease
Gina Pighetti, University of Tennessee Genomic strategies help uncover crucial mediators in mammary health and disease

Tuesday PM

Teaching and Extension Education Symposium: Strategies to Motivate Student Interest in Animal Science Undergraduate Programs (additional fee required)

Teaching and Extension Education Symposium: Strategies to Motivate Student Interest in Animal Science Undergraduate Programs (additional fee required)

A link exists between active, intrinsically motivated learning and subject-specific curiosity. This link may be used in the classroom to support academic performance. Increasing student interest may directly increase students’ motivation to continue studying animal science. The structure of the course environment and activities affect student interest. This combined symposium and workshop will provide attendees with tools and classroom interventions designed to increase student interest. Topics that will be included during the symposium portion include the pedagogy of motivation and examples of ways to create interest. Examples include utilizing technology in large classrooms, the relationship between grades and motivation, and embedding motivational strategies into a departmental animal science curriculum. This symposium/workshop includes lunch and is a ticketed event.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Erica Lott, Purdue University Overview of motivation theory and application
Marshal Stern, University of Minnesota Motivation and interest in online courses
Elizabeth Karcher, Purdue University Putting theory into practice: Teaching strategies to increase student engagement and interest in the classroom
Michel Wattiaux, University of Wisconsin- Madison Uses of technology to increase interest and learning
Marshall Stern, University of Minnesota Motivation and interest in online courses
Dairy Foods Symposium: Making Lactose the Carbohydrate of Choice—Innovations in Valorizing Lactose into Novel Ingredients to Address Current Consumer Needs

Dairy Foods Symposium: Making Lactose the Carbohydrate of Choice—Innovations in Valorizing Lactose into Novel Ingredients to Address Current Consumer Needs

According to Innova Market Insights, “consumers have a rising interest in the role that nutrition can play in supporting their emotional and mental wellbeing.” This has led to an increased focus on new products with reduced sugar and increased fiber, as well as incorporation of functional ingredients. Lactose is the second major component in milk after water. It is also one of the major components of various coproduct streams such as whey, acid whey, and permeates that are produced during manufacture of dairy products and ingredients. Lactose is a unique disaccharide and, with emerging bioconversion technologies, it is well positioned to fulfill this growing demand. This symposium reviews current innovations in the field of valorizing lactose into various value-added products such as rare sugars, fibers, and other functional ingredients.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Rohit Kapoor, National Dairy Council Dairy ingredients for health: Opportunities to convert lactose into value-added ingredients
Gareth Wallis, University of Birmingham, UK Emerging roles for lactose and its constituent monosaccharides in sports nutrition
Zhixin Wang, Cornell University, and Julie Goddard, Cornell University Mining value-added, “naturally derived” sweeteners from dairy co-product streams
Zhixin Wang, Cornell University, and Julie Goddard, Cornell University  
Tonya Schoenfuss, University of Minnesota Polylactose: Emerging ingredient for human health
Daniela Barile, UC Davis Lactose-derived oligosaccharides: Sources, technology, bioactivity, and health benefits
Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Balancing Dietary Carbohydrates to Optimize Nutrient Intake and Partitioning

Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Balancing Dietary Carbohydrates to Optimize Nutrient Intake and Partitioning

Animal Health Symposium: Adipose Tissue in Transition Dairy Cows as an Integrator of Metabolic and Inflammatory Cues in Health and Disease

Animal Health Symposium: Adipose Tissue in Transition Dairy Cows as an Integrator of Metabolic and Inflammatory Cues in Health and Disease

Adipose tissue (AT) functions as the major body of energy reserve in dairy cows. During the transition period of dairy cows, negative energy balance induces lipolysis and fatty acids are released from triglyceride stores within adipocytes. However, AT is more than an energy warehouse. As a major endocrine organ, AT modulates energy utilization by peripheral organs by secretion of adipokines and bioactive lipids. Some examples of AT endocrine functions include self-regulation of lipolysis and the synthesis of fatty acids and triglycerides to buffer systemic energy availability; regulation of feed intake through secretion of leptin and other adipokines; and modulation of insulin sensitivity through the synthesis of adiponectin. The rapid reduction in size of AT depots during the transition period induces an inflammatory response within AT that may, depending on the intensity, predispose periparturient dairy cows to inflammatory and metabolic diseases. Finally, AT-derived bioactive lipids and adipokines can also influence reproductive performance.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Geert Opsomer, Ghent University Adipose tissue insulin resistance: Homeorhetic adaptation or risk factor for periparturient disease
Helga Sauerwein, University of Bonn Adipose tissue endocrinology in the periparturient period
Maya Zachut, Volcani Institute A proteomics approach to unravel adipose tissue inflammatory responses in peripartum cows
Andres Contreras, Michigan State University Oxidative stress in the adipose tissue: Magnifying the risk for periparturient disease
Sabine Mann, Cornell University Modulating adipose tissue function to prevent disease and enhance production: Approaches, gaps in knowledge, and future research
Reproduction Symposium: Do We Need Estrus?

Reproduction Symposium: Do We Need Estrus?

During this symposium, the speakers will discuss whether expression of estrus is relevant to herd reproductive performance under different management strategies.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Ricardo Chebel, University of Florida Activity monitors: Is it possible to design a selective reproductive program according to the cow’s needs?
Ronaldo Cerri, University of British Columbia Influences of estrous intensity on fertility in dairy cattle
Paul Fricke, University of Wisconsin TBD
Stephen Butler, Moorepark AGRIC (Ireland) Artificial insemination after detected estrus underpins efficient seasonal calving in pasture-based systems
Production, Management, and Environment Platform Session: Automation in the Dairy Industry (DC38)

Production, Management, and Environment Platform Session: Automation in the Dairy Industry (DC38)

The adoption of automated technologies in the dairy industry has grown rapidly in the past 10 years. Adoption of these technologies is likely to continue, being driven by labor availability and quality of life issues on farms. These technologies affect feed management, facility design, labor needs, and how dairy producers interact with their herd.

Current and future issues related to the adoption of automation in the US dairy industry will be addressed during this platform session, including an overview of automation on dairy farms, robotic/automated milking, automated feeding systems, and the future of automation. This session is a follow-up to the 38th Discover Conference “Automation in the Dairy Industry,” held in May 2020.

An invited speaker will provide an overview of the conference themes, followed by submitted abstract talks related to the conference themes and a discussion period involving all attendees.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Marcia Endres, University of Minnesota Discover 38—Automation in the Dairy Industry

Wednesday Full Day

Riddet Institute and AgResearch International Partnership Program Symposium

Riddet Institute and AgResearch International Partnership Program Symposium

Wednesday AM

Small Ruminant Platform Session: New Perspectives in Feeding and Management Strategies to Improve Nutritional Properties of Small Ruminant–Derived Products

Small Ruminant Platform Session: New Perspectives in Feeding and Management Strategies to Improve Nutritional Properties of Small Ruminant–Derived Products

Dairy research has focused on increasing the nutritional value of animal products since the beginning of the century. In particular, fatty acid composition has been deeply studied with the aim to enrich milk fat with unsaturated fatty acids and reduce saturated fatty acids to improve human health. In this respect, nutrition is the most powerful environmental effect able to modify milk fat synthesis and fatty acid composition. Recent studies have identified bioactive compounds in milk and ruminant products characterized by peculiar activities associated with human health. Consumer awareness of food-producing animal welfare and sustainability of production systems has increased in recent years and both dairy industry and legislation are paying increasing attention to husbandry practices. From this perspective, the association between animal welfare and management and the quality of the product is often coupled but is not always easy to demonstrate. The possibility to highlight improvements in the nutritional properties of animal products by changing animal management strategies is very promising in this context. The aim of this platform session will be to provide an update on feeding strategies that can improve milk fat composition in small ruminants

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Marcello Mele, University of Pisa Updating feeding strategies to improve milk fat composition in small ruminants
Maria Luisa Balestrieri, University of Campania Functional metabolites in ruminant dairy products: How can we influence them through management?
EAAP Exchange Symposium: Limits in Production Growth on Level of Cow, Farm, and Industry (Physiological, Genetic, Management, Environmental Aspects)

EAAP Exchange Symposium: Limits in Production Growth on Level of Cow, Farm, and Industry (Physiological, Genetic, Management, Environmental Aspects)

Growth is the most uniform factor on agricultural farms. In dairy farming, this concerns larger herds with ever-increasing milk yields. Is continuous growth sustainable? This symposium deals with possible limits in milk production by physiological, management, environmental, economic, and societal factors.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Mike Van Amburgh, Cornell University Opportunities to improve the productive potential of dairy cattle from conception through calving
Josef Gross, University of Bern (Switzerland) Physiological limits of milk production in dairy cows
Robin White, Virginia Tech Long-term productivity changes in the dairy industry and projected impacts on global food production
Martin Scholten, Wageningen University and Research (the Netherlands) About the essential role of dairy in future food production within the planetary boundaries
Animal Behavior and Well-Being Platform Session: New Frontiers in Understanding Dairy Cattle Emotions

Animal Behavior and Well-Being Platform Session: New Frontiers in Understanding Dairy Cattle Emotions

Exciting, novel approaches to use behavior to assess dairy cattle affective states are emerging. This session will consolidate abstracts submitted under this theme in a platform session, with an opening invited talk delivered by a researcher with particularly novel and exciting methods to present.

Growth and Development Symposium: Metabolic Derangements in Calves During the Preweaning Period

Growth and Development Symposium: Metabolic Derangements in Calves During the Preweaning Period

Neonatal diarrhea in calves is a result of electrolyte and acid–base imbalance; this condition represents a significant economic loss to the dairy industry and continues to be the most common disease in preweaned dairy calves in the United States, accounting for 56.4% of deaths. In the past 2 years, new research on metabolic ion changes during preweaning have been published but this topic has not been widely discussed, especially in the United States.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Ingrid Lorenz, European College of Bovine Health Management Calf health from birth to weaning: Nutritional aspects of disease prevention
Richard Pereira, UC Davis Antimicrobial resistance in preweaning calves when fed waste milk and effect on health and development: Current and future status on the use of waste milk in the dairy industry
Tom Earleywine, Land O’Lakes Nutrition and management strategies to reduce gut dysfunction in calves

Wednesday PM

Reproduction Symposium: Prebreeding Predictors of Fertility

Reproduction Symposium: Prebreeding Predictors of Fertility

The invited speakers in this session will discuss recently discovered ways to monitor and predict fertility potential in dairy cattle.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Richard Pursley, Michigan State University Prebreeding markers that affect pregnancy per AI and pregnancy losses following first AI
Julio Giordano, Cornell University Use of multiple sources of biological, management, and performance data for the design of targeted reproductive management strategies for dairy cows
Joe Dalton, University of Idaho Genomics of fertility in Holstein heifers
Fernando Biase Using leukocyte transcriptome analysis to predict fertility potential in heifers
ARPAS Symposium: New Advances in Dairy Efficiency

ARPAS Symposium: New Advances in Dairy Efficiency

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Jeff Firkins, The Ohio State University Advances in rumen efficiency
Alex Bach, ICREA, Spain Advances in efficiency in growing dairy replacements
Mike VandeHaar, Michigan State University Advances in production efficiency in adult dairy cattle
Equids Milk Production: Scientific Challenges and Perspectives

Equids Milk Production: Scientific Challenges and Perspectives

In the last 40 years, there has been growing interest from scientific community in dairy production from mares and jennies at the farm level on milk quality, milk processing, and on the effects of equid dairy products on human health (e.g., microbiome, immunity, cancer, infectious diseases, skin disorder). This symposium aims to furnish an overall analysis on knowledge on this area and highlight the scientific challenges in terms of improving milk production from both a quantitative and qualitative point of view (e.g., milking management, suckling foal management, feeding management, animal welfare, genetic selection), implementing processing techniques to ensure longer shelf life, and increasing dairy product variability on the market, through scientifically sound studies of the effects on human health.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Pasquale De Palo, University of Bari A. Moro (Italy) Title TBD
Klemen Potocknick, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia) Title TBD
Photis Papademas, Cyprus University of Technology Title TBD
Mauro Serafini, University of Teramo (Italy) Title TBD
Production, Management, and the Environment Symposium: Natural Bioactives in Dairy Production - Science, Functions, and the Future (DC37)

Production, Management, and the Environment Symposium: Natural Bioactives in Dairy Production - Science, Functions, and the Future (DC37)

The program for the 37th ADSA Discover Conference (DC37), “Natural Bioactives in Dairy Production: Science, Functions, and the Future,” which was held October 28–31, 2019, focused on the latest developments in understanding how specific nutrients or compounds alter animal performance through immune stimulation, microbial modification, metabolic regulation, and inflammation reduction. A mini symposium planned for Wednesday, June 24, in West Palm Beach, Florida, will summarize the results from DC37, discuss strategies to implement research findings, and focus ongoing and future research to implement non-nutrient compounds as a reliable alternative for dairy farmers to improve health and performance in the herd.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Johan Osorio, South Dakota State University Science: A multidisciplinary approach to develop, produce, and understand natural bioactives
Todd Callaway, University of Georgia Function: Results from the 37th Discover Conference on Natural Bioactives in Dairy Production: Science, Functions and the Future