Symposia and Workshops

 

Sunday

Workshop: Dairy Records Analysis

Workshop: Dairy Records Analysis

ADSA Graduate Student Division Symposium: Publishing in JDS

ADSA Graduate Student Division Symposium: Publishing in JDS

NANP Nutrition Models Workshop

NANP Nutrition Models Workshop

The National Animal Nutrition Program (NANP) Nutrition Models Workshop will use lectures and exercises to illustrate how mathematical models are constructed, evaluated, and applied towards problems in animal nutrition. The workshop will give attendees a basic fluency in mathematical modeling and, in so doing, advance their use of models in nutrition research.

Program

Lectures are 30 min, and exercises are 60 min

  • Welcoming remarks (Tim Hackmann, University of California, Davis)
  • Tutorial on R
    • Speaker: Veridiana Daley (Land O’Lakes)
    • Objectives
      • Ensure R statistical software is correctly installed on attendee laptops
      • Walk through basic data manipulation, visualization, and other functions
  • Model construction: lecture
    • Speaker: Tim Hackmann (University of California, Davis)
    • Objectives
      • Discuss history of modeling and role in research
      • Distinguish between different types of models (deterministic vs. static, etc.)
      • Walk through steps of constructing a dynamic, deterministic model
        • Write a model using a conceptual diagram
        • Translate a model diagram into set of differential equations
        • Explain different approaches for solving model equations
  • Model construction: exercises
    • Speaker: Tim Hackmann (University of California, Davis)
    • Objectives
      • Speaker constructs a model of rumen fermentation from first principles using
        • Excel
        • R
  • Meta-analysis: lecture
    • Speaker: Veridiana Daley (Land O’Lakes)
    • Objectives
      • Explain the theory and motivation of a meta-analysis
  • Meta-analysis: exercises
    • Speaker: Veridiana Daley (Land O’Lakes)
    • Objectives
      • Speaker shows meta-analysis with example dataset
      • Attendees conduct own meta-analysis with second dataset and R script
  • Lunch
  • Model evaluation: lecture
    • Speaker: Henk van Lingen (University of California, Davis)
    • Objectives
      • Identify strength, weakness, and relevance of different evaluation statistics (e.g., R2, CCC, RMSPE)
      • Explain procedure and utility of sensitivity analysis
  • Model evaluation: exercises
    • Speaker: Henk van Lingen (University of California, Davis)
    • Objectives
      • Speaker conducts an evaluation with example dataset and R script
      • Attendees conduct own evaluation with a second example dataset
  • The Dairy NRC model: lecture
    • Speaker: Mark Hanigan (Virginia Tech)
    • Objectives
      • Review major features and updates to Dairy NRC
  • The Dairy NRC model: exercises
    • Speaker: Mark Hanigan (Virginia Tech)
    • Objectives
      • Walk though Dairy NRC model
      • Attendees formulate a diet
  • Closing remarks (Tim Hackmann, University of California, Davis)
Mixed Models Workshop

Mixed Models Workshop

List of Symposia

As of 11/2020, subject to change

Animal Behavior and Well-Being Platform Session: New Frontiers in Understanding Dairy Cattle Emotions

Animal Behavior and Well-Being Platform Session: New Frontiers in Understanding Dairy Cattle Emotions

Exciting, novel approaches to use behavior to assess dairy cattle affective states are emerging. This session will consolidate abstracts submitted under this theme in a platform session, with an opening invited talk delivered by a researcher with particularly novel and exciting methods to present.

Animal Behavior and Well-Being Symposium: Translating Animal Welfare Science—Animal Experiences, Dairy Production Implications, and Societal Viewpoints

Animal Behavior and Well-Being Symposium: Translating Animal Welfare Science—Animal Experiences, Dairy Production Implications, and Societal Viewpoints

Despite scientific advances that drive an increasing ability to understand animal experiences across species, there is a divide between our ability to implement and support management changes that improve dairy cattle welfare on-farm and our consideration and understanding of societal viewpoints. In this symposium, we propose to bring together different viewpoints on (1) basic research to measure animal emotions, (2) applied approaches to improve welfare within typical dairy production settings, and (3) societal viewpoints on dairy animal welfare. We aim to draw, in part, on expertise outside dairy cattle to provide novel viewpoints, and include speakers who can provide a global perspective. The symposium will include a panel discussion to stimulate debate and reflection on the future of animal agriculture, in consideration of these various viewpoints on animal welfare.

Animal Health Symposium: Adipose Tissue in Transition Dairy Cows as an Integrator of Metabolic and Inflammatory Cues in Health and Disease

Animal Health Symposium: Adipose Tissue in Transition Dairy Cows as an Integrator of Metabolic and Inflammatory Cues in Health and Disease

Adipose tissue (AT) functions as the major body of energy reserve in dairy cows. During the transition period of dairy cows, negative energy balance induces lipolysis and fatty acids are released from triglyceride stores within adipocytes. However, AT is more than an energy warehouse. As a major endocrine organ, AT modulates energy utilization by peripheral organs by secretion of adipokines and bioactive lipids. Some examples of AT endocrine functions include self-regulation of lipolysis and the synthesis of fatty acids and triglycerides to buffer systemic energy availability; regulation of feed intake through secretion of leptin and other adipokines; and modulation of insulin sensitivity through the synthesis of adiponectin. The rapid reduction in size of AT depots during the transition period induces an inflammatory response within AT that may, depending on the intensity, predispose periparturient dairy cows to inflammatory and metabolic diseases. Finally, AT-derived bioactive lipids and adipokines can also influence reproductive performance.

ARPAS Symposium: Building a Resilient Food Production System: What Covid-19 and Other Black Swan Events Have Exposed about Modern Food Production

ARPAS Symposium: Building a Resilient Food Production System: What Covid-19 and Other Black Swan Events Have Exposed about Modern Food Production

Breeding and Genetics Symposium: Not Just Another Liquid—The Genetics of Milk

Breeding and Genetics Symposium: Not Just Another Liquid—The Genetics of Milk

In this symposium, we will highlight and stress the properties of milk that can be altered using genetic and genomic approaches (e.g., A2 milk, fatty acid profiles, use of mid-infrared technology) and discuss payment schemes and retailer/consumer perspectives on such alterations. This symposium will focus on the development of this implementation in all dairy breeds, its impact, and especially look to new developments and future scenarios.

CSAS Symposium

CSAS Symposium

Dairy Foods Symposium: Making Lactose the Carbohydrate of Choice—Innovations in Valorizing Lactose into Novel Ingredients to Address Current Consumer Needs

Dairy Foods Symposium: Making Lactose the Carbohydrate of Choice—Innovations in Valorizing Lactose into Novel Ingredients to Address Current Consumer Needs

According to Innova Market Insights, “consumers have a rising interest in the role that nutrition can play in supporting their emotional and mental wellbeing.” This has led to an increased focus on new products with reduced sugar and increased fiber, as well as incorporation of functional ingredients. Lactose is the second major component in milk after water. It is also one of the major components of various coproduct streams such as whey, acid whey, and permeates that are produced during manufacture of dairy products and ingredients. Lactose is a unique disaccharide and, with emerging bioconversion technologies, it is well positioned to fulfill this growing demand. This symposium reviews current innovations in the field of valorizing lactose into various value-added products such as rare sugars, fibers, and other functional ingredients.

Dairy Foods Symposium: Nourish to Flourish—The Role of Product, Process, and Package in Driving Milk Consumption Among Children

Dairy Foods Symposium: Nourish to Flourish—The Role of Product, Process, and Package in Driving Milk Consumption Among Children

Milk intake from the school breakfast program and the national school lunch program accounts for >75% of daily milk intake among children from 5 to 18 years old. This highlights the importance of these programs in driving fluid milk consumption in children. Fluid milk is one of the major contributors to dietary calcium and vitamin D in the diets of children, and its consumption is an important factor that influences their overall nourishment. Increasing fluid milk consumption among children is important because milk consumption is a behavioral trait that continues into adulthood and could stop the steady decline in fluid milk consumption among adolescents. The National Dairy Council is sponsoring this symposium reviewing the latest research and insights to drive milk consumption among children.

Dairy Foods Symposium: Reducing Dairy Food Loss and Waste

Dairy Foods Symposium: Reducing Dairy Food Loss and Waste

Food loss and waste is a significant global problem, with nearly one-third of the world’s food supply, approximately 1.3 billion tons, lost or wasted every year. Dairy foods have one of the highest rates of food loss and waste, with 20% lost or wasted globally and just over 30% lost or wasted in the United States. The impacts of these losses are widespread, with economic, environmental, and nutritional consequences. The dairy industry must take steps to combat food loss and waste throughout the production-to-consumer continuum. In this symposium, we explore the effects of dairy food loss and waste on our industry and consumers and discuss strategies to reduce this loss and waste throughout the dairy continuum.

EAAP Exchange Symposium: Limits in Production Growth on Level of Cow, Farm, and Industry (Physiological, Genetic, Management, Environmental Aspects)

EAAP Exchange Symposium: Limits in Production Growth on Level of Cow, Farm, and Industry (Physiological, Genetic, Management, Environmental Aspects)

Growth is the most uniform factor on agricultural farms. In dairy farming, this concerns larger herds with ever-increasing milk yields. Is continuous growth sustainable? This symposium deals with possible limits in milk production by physiological, management, environmental, economic, and societal factors.

Equids Milk Production: Scientific Challenges and Perspectives

Equids Milk Production: Scientific Challenges and Perspectives

In the last 40 years, there has been growing interest from scientific community in dairy production from mares and jennies at the farm level on milk quality, milk processing, and on the effects of equid dairy products on human health (e.g., microbiome, immunity, cancer, infectious diseases, skin disorder). This symposium aims to furnish an overall analysis on knowledge on this area and highlight the scientific challenges in terms of improving milk production from both a quantitative and qualitative point of view (e.g., milking management, suckling foal management, feeding management, animal welfare, genetic selection), implementing processing techniques to ensure longer shelf life, and increasing dairy product variability on the market, through scientifically sound studies of the effects on human health.

Extension Education Symposium: Social Media Influencers—Facts and Fiction About Consumers and the Dairy Community

Extension Education Symposium: Social Media Influencers—Facts and Fiction About Consumers and the Dairy Community

Today’s consumers are very different than they used to be yet they have a strong interest in where their food comes from, including how food animals are raised and handled. Social media influencers may or may not rely on science but do use feelings and emotions to share their stories and opinions. Social media influencers are lacking in production agriculture, and those that do exist use science (facts) and typically don’t use feelings and emotions. To help build consumer trust in dairy products, this symposium will provide information about the role of social media influencers, how they drive consumer trends, and the opportunities for the dairy community.

Forages and Pastures Symposium: Linking Forage Quality to Herd Productivity

Forages and Pastures Symposium: Linking Forage Quality to Herd Productivity

Forage quality makes up the majority of the diet in most dairy animals. In fact, a trend over the past 20 years of using more highly digestible forage hybrids has resulted in greater adoption of higher forage diets without sacrificing productivity. Often, it is a challenge to make the leap from seeing responses in a research setting and observing similar observations in field settings, where the environment is not controlled. The objective of this symposium is present the responses of forage quality in a controlled setting, determine predictability of how controlled research corresponds with field responses, and how to connect the two areas.

Growth and Development Symposium: Metabolic Derangements in Calves During the Preweaning Period

Growth and Development Symposium: Metabolic Derangements in Calves During the Preweaning Period

Neonatal diarrhea in calves is a result of electrolyte and acid–base imbalance; this condition represents a significant economic loss to the dairy industry and continues to be the most common disease in preweaned dairy calves in the United States, accounting for 56.4% of deaths. In the past 2 years, new research on metabolic ion changes during preweaning have been published but this topic has not been widely discussed, especially in the United States.

Lactation Biology Symposium: Mammary Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses During Involution and Disease: Mammary Gland Immunity and Health

Lactation Biology Symposium: Mammary Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses During Involution and Disease: Mammary Gland Immunity and Health

The mammary gland is a modified skin gland and therefore plays a role in the innate immune system; moreover, the adaptive immune response is important during development and health. Understanding mammary immunity and how management, nutrition, genomics and environment affect it will enhance health, production and welfare of the dairy cow.

Production, Management, and the Environment: Advances in Enteric Methane Mitigation in Dairy Cattle - The Last Decade and Future Prospects

Production, Management, and the Environment: Advances in Enteric Methane Mitigation in Dairy Cattle - The Last Decade and Future Prospects

Reproduction Symposium: Do We Need Estrus?

Reproduction Symposium: Do We Need Estrus?

During this symposium, the speakers will discuss whether expression of estrus is relevant to herd reproductive performance under different management strategies.

Reproduction Symposium: Prebreeding Predictors of Fertility

Reproduction Symposium: Prebreeding Predictors of Fertility

The invited speakers in this session will discuss recently discovered ways to monitor and predict fertility potential in dairy cattle.

Riddet Institute and AgResearch International Partnership Program Symposium

Riddet Institute and AgResearch International Partnership Program Symposium

Ruminant Nutrition: NRC and DC 40 Update

Ruminant Nutrition: NRC and DC 40 Update

Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Balancing Dietary Carbohydrates to Optimize Nutrient Intake and Partitioning

Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Balancing Dietary Carbohydrates to Optimize Nutrient Intake and Partitioning

Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Understanding Fiber Digestion and Applications for Diet Formulation

Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Understanding Fiber Digestion and Applications for Diet Formulation

Small Ruminant Platform Session: New Perspectives in Feeding and Management Strategies to Improve Nutritional Properties of Small Ruminant–Derived Products

Small Ruminant Platform Session: New Perspectives in Feeding and Management Strategies to Improve Nutritional Properties of Small Ruminant–Derived Products

Dairy research has focused on increasing the nutritional value of animal products since the beginning of the century. In particular, fatty acid composition has been deeply studied with the aim to enrich milk fat with unsaturated fatty acids and reduce saturated fatty acids to improve human health. In this respect, nutrition is the most powerful environmental effect able to modify milk fat synthesis and fatty acid composition. Recent studies have identified bioactive compounds in milk and ruminant products characterized by peculiar activities associated with human health. Consumer awareness of food-producing animal welfare and sustainability of production systems has increased in recent years and both dairy industry and legislation are paying increasing attention to husbandry practices. From this perspective, the association between animal welfare and management and the quality of the product is often coupled but is not always easy to demonstrate. The possibility to highlight improvements in the nutritional properties of animal products by changing animal management strategies is very promising in this context. The aim of this platform session will be to provide an update on feeding strategies that can improve milk fat composition in small ruminants

Special Session: FASS Scientific Policy Committee—Role of ADSA and FASS in Supporting USDA/NIFA AG Research

Special Session: FASS Scientific Policy Committee—Role of ADSA and FASS in Supporting USDA/NIFA AG Research

  1. Broad introduction: what are current USDA REE research priorities and training functions; where does the training of students and young faculty/scientists fit in the priorities, what is the current status of staffing and operations for NIFA and ERS?
  2. There is an increased focus in public and private research on integrated systems research and application including data sciences and infrastructure, what does this mean moving forward especially for students and young faculty/scientists?
  3. What is the status of the Ag Innovation Agenda and planning for the next Farm Bill?
  4. What is the status of Ag research funding in the FY21 and proposed FY22 budget
  5. How can ADSA, FASS, other organizations and individual scientists, especially students and young faculty/scientists, best provide input and support these functions.

    The idea for this symposium is based on several continuing needs for agriculture, including animal agricultural research, training and education. It is also spurred by recent advances in data sciences and an increasing priority at the federal level as well as industry for integrated systems research and application, and training of graduates with computations/data science skills. The role of organizations like ADSA, FASS and other professional organizations is often overlooked or even unknown by most members. Members of organizations such as ADSA, especially students and newer/younger members rarely get a chance to see the ‘big picture’: what is happening relative to federal and private funding; what industry and society say they are looking for in graduates; and “What can we do about it?”

    Many agricultural science organizations have full time or part time lobbyists in Washington who attempt to increase support for agricultural research and application. However, these efforts are often not well aligned with federal priorities and frequently are not coordinated, leading to a diluted effort and stagnant funding.

    This symposium will help people better understand current priorities and future directions, what organizations like FASS and ADSA are doing to support both funding and priority identification, and what individuals can do.
Teaching and Extension Education Symposium: Strategies to Motivate Student Interest in Animal Science Undergraduate Programs (additional fee required)

Teaching and Extension Education Symposium: Strategies to Motivate Student Interest in Animal Science Undergraduate Programs (additional fee required)

A link exists between active, intrinsically motivated learning and subject-specific curiosity. This link may be used in the classroom to support academic performance. Increasing student interest may directly increase students’ motivation to continue studying animal science. The structure of the course environment and activities affect student interest. This combined symposium and workshop will provide attendees with tools and classroom interventions designed to increase student interest. Topics that will be included during the symposium portion include the pedagogy of motivation and examples of ways to create interest. Examples include utilizing technology in large classrooms, the relationship between grades and motivation, and embedding motivational strategies into a departmental animal science curriculum. This symposium/workshop includes lunch and is a ticketed event.