Program

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HOT TOPIC SESSIONS!

BREAKING! Hot Topic Panel: H5N1 Bird Flu Outbreak and its Impact on Dairy

ADSA is committed to providing our community with the most critical and timely information affecting the dairy science sector. That's why we're adding a late-breaking hot topic panel discussion on the H5N1 bird flu outbreak and its impact on dairy to ADSA's Annual Meeting program in West Palm Beach.

Hosted in the theater stage of the #ADSA2024 exhibit hall before the afternoon poster sessions begin, the two-part panel discussion happening Monday and Tuesday from 4:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. will offer a chance to hear an expert discussion on the current bird flu outbreak and its impact on dairy foods and dairy production, as well as provide an opportunity for an audience Q&A. Panelists include

  • Moderator Jessica McArt, PhD, DVM, DABVP (Dairy Practice), editor in chief of JDS Communications and associate professor, interim department chair, and veterinary epidemiologist at Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine
  • Steve Zeng, PhD, director of the Food Safety Division of the US Department of Agriculture
  • Pamela Ruegg, DVM, MPVM, David J. Ellis chair in antimicrobial resistance and director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship and Dairy Health Management Laboratory at Michigan State University
  • Nicole Martin, PhD, assistant research professor in dairy foods microbiology and the associate director of the Milk Quality Improvement Program in the Department of Food Science at Cornell University

Symposia and Workshops

 

Sunday

Techniques for Design to Data Analysis: A Case Study Using GreenFeed Sponsored by C-Lock and the USDA National Animal Nutrition Program. (full day; ADDITIONAL FEE REQUIRED)

Dr. Harrison, C-Lock's lead scientific advisor, will lead the morning session and focus on GreenFeed principles, experimental design, and sampling.

The afternoon session—led by Guillermo Martinez Boggio and Francisco Peñagaricano (University of Wisconsin–Madison), Paulo de Méo Filho and Ermias Kebreab (University of California, Davis), and Alexander Hristov (The Pennsylvania State University)—will focus on data exploration, analysis, and interpretation.

Participants should have some experience using R or SAS and bring their own computer to the afternoon workshop session for maximum benefit.

Limited to 50 participants. Lunch included.
$70 for professional members; $35 for students.

workshop
Dairy Records Management (half day, P.M.; ADDITIONAL FEE REQUIRED)

Dairy Records Management (half day, P.M.; ADDITIONAL FEE REQUIRED)

The workshop will provide participants with hands-on experience using a new suite of DRMS products called HerdHQ®

The training will focus on how to obtain the most benefits using the individual modules that are part of HerdHQ®. Overall herd management can be evaluated using tools such as DairyDepot®, MilkMetrics® and ActivityAlerts®. Participants will build custom dashboards using DairyDepot®, which features over 100 charts and tables that participants can select from; ActivityAlerts® is used to summarize herd activities such as breeding, health events, and chores to determine areas of underperformance. MilkMetrics® is focused on test-day data, and users will define alerts and create comparisons with peer herds. Other HerdHQ® products featured during the training are HeiferHub® and KeepOrBeef®. 

With growing emphasis on breeding dairy cattle to beef bulls, these products address the challenges dairy producers face in making breeding decisions to ensure there will be enough replacement animals in the future, while maximizing returns from breeding cows to beef bulls. The final product will focus on selective dry cow therapy, providing the participants a decision support tool that assists the producer in determining which cows are potential candidates for selective cow therapy.

Although the greatest value is obtained from herds using DRMS Dart herd management software, HerdHQ® products also work for DRMS herds that do not use Dart. Participants are not required to have knowledge of Dart; however, a basic understanding of how data are used to evaluate herd management is recommended. We encourage consultants, producers, dairy extension and research faculty, including students, to attend this workshop.

Participants are required to bring their own computer (or tablet) using a Windows, iOS, or Android operating system with internet access capability. Computers must have a current version of an internet browser installed, for example Firefox, Safari, Google Chrome, or Microsoft Edge.

dairy foods
interdisciplinary
Championing Women in Dairy Science: Remembering the Legacy of Susan Duncan (afternoon session)

Championing Women in Dairy Science: Remembering the Legacy of Susan Duncan

Susan Duncan was a trailblazer in the field of food and dairy science. The first woman to be hired as an assistant professor in the Department of Food Science and Technology at Virginia Tech, Sue made an impact on the lives of dozens of students, researchers, and scientists. She served ADSA in many capacities including as Dairy Foods Division Director, Vice President, and President. In this symposium, we will remember the ongoing legacy of Sue Duncan with an emphasis on her role as a champion of women in dairy science. All ADSA members are encouraged to attend, but a special invitation is extended to the women in our dairy science community, including our next generation of dairy leaders. A reception will follow the symposium.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Karen Schmidt, Kansas State University Who is Dr. Susan Duncan?
Grace Lewis, University of Wisconsin–River Falls Engaging today’s undergraduate women with the field of dairy science
Sabine Mann, Cornell University Mentoring while still being mentored: Championing women in dairy science as an early-career faculty
Laura Colby, Land O’Lakes Navigating industry careers as a woman in dairy science
Laura Hernandez, University of Wisconsin–Madison Being a mom and doing research about moms: When life and work collide
MaryAnne Drake, North Carolina State University Building a strong team
Karen Plaut, Purdue University The critical role of women in leadership positions in the dairy industry
ADSA 2024 Annual Meeting Opening Session | The Dublin Declaration of Scientists on the Societal Role of Livestock: Recalibrating the Conversation on Animal Production

ADSA 2024 ANNUAL MEETING OPENING SESSION (6:30 – 7:30 P.M.)

The Dublin Declaration of Scientists on the Societal Role of Livestock is an influential document endorsed by over 1,000 scientists, advocating for the significance of livestock in food systems. It cautions against exaggerated and unfounded criticisms, while amplifying the perspectives of numerous scientists globally who are committed to rigorous and objective research. The declaration underscores the importance of a balanced outlook on the future of animal agriculture. By doing so, the Declaration argues that "livestock systems must continue to be embedded in and have broad approval of society.

For that, scientists are asked to provide reliable evidence of their nutrition and health benefits, environmental sustainability, socio-cultural and economic values, as well as for solutions for the many improvements that are needed." The declaration thus aims to "give voice to the many scientists around the world who research diligently, honestly, and successfully in the various disciplines in order to achieve a balanced view of the future of animal agriculture."

During this year's keynote presentation, an overview will be given of the origins, content, and impact of the Declaration.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Frédéric Leroy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel The Dublin Declaration of Scientists on the Societal Role of Livestock: Recalibrating the Conversation on Animal Production

 

Monday A.M.

breeding & genetics
ruminant nutrition
production, management, environment
CSAS
Beefing Up Dairy – Exploring the Advantages of Beef-on-Dairy

Beefing Up Dairy—Exploring the Advantages of Beef-on-Dairy

Joint symposium with the Canadian Society of Animal Science (CSAS)

In the ever-evolving landscape of agriculture, innovation and collaboration have emerged as vital drivers of progress. Within this context, the concept of “beef-on-dairy,” or the incorporation of beef genetics into dairy operations, has garnered significant attention due to its potential to reshape the dynamics of both the dairy and beef industries, and holds major significance for dairy producers seeking innovative ways to optimize their operations. The large adoption of sexed semen has impacted the requirement of dairy-on-dairy matings, and many dairy farmers are swiftly adopting the idea of using beef semen in their dairy animals. Through crossbreeding dairy cows with beef bulls, producers can generate income from the sale of beef calves, diversifying their income sources and mitigating potential fluctuations in milk prices. This added financial stability is a key asset for dairy operations. Moreover, the practice addresses the challenge of male-calf surplus in dairy farming. By incorporating beef-on-dairy practices, male calves can be reared for beef production, transforming an underutilized resource into a valuable asset.  

By delving into the intricate relationship between beef-on-dairy integration and dairy production, this symposium will focus on key challenges faced by dairy producers using a multidisciplinary approach. By addressing animal nutrition, breeding strategies, and management, this symposium promises to be a wellspring of knowledge guiding dairy and beef industries toward a future of resource optimization and economic stability. This symposium encapsulates the essence of innovation, collaboration, and sustainability that are vital in harnessing the potential of beef on dairy integration to transform the dairy sector. The insights and strategies shared within this symposium have the power to shape the industry’s trajectory, paving the way for a more resilient, sustainable, and market-driven dairy landscape.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Melissa Bowers, L’Alliance Boviteq Beef-on-dairy, sexed semen, and IVF: A producer prospective
Donagh Berry, Teasgasc Beef-on-dairy experiences from Ireland
Michael Steele, University of Guelph How the dairy industry can become a sustainable source of beef
Allison Fleming, Lactanet Insemination trends and the rise in beef and sexed sire semen in North America
growth & development
animal health
lactation biology
ARPAS
From Birth to Lactation

From Birth to Lactation

Joint symposium with the American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists (ARPAS)

Recent updates on colostrum and immunoglobulin G production as affected by on-farm and environmental factors, weaning challenges, and the effect of age of first calving and dystocia on first and subsequent lactations. The purpose of this symposium will be to provide knowledge and data to help fill gaps on the growth and health of calves and heifers.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Peter Erickson, University of New Hampshire Factors influencing colostrum production in multiparous Holstein and Jersey cows at multiple locations
James Drackley, University of Illinois Weaning transition in dairy calves—Why so traumatic?
Marcos Marcondes, Washington State University Connecting the dots: Calving ease, age at first calving, and enhanced cow production
dairy foods
Novel Technologies to Improve the Texture and Flavor of Cheese

Novel Technologies to Improve the Texture and Flavor of Cheese

This symposium will explore new approaches for the manufacture of various cheeses, including an overview of the growing use of membrane filtration to standardize cheese milks and its impact on the functionality and yield of cheese. A strategy to eliminate the need for curd washing to control the acidity during cheesemaking will also be covered. This technique is called lactose standardization, and it involves standardizing the milk for protein and fat content as well as lactose content to directly control the final pH of the cheese. Lactose standardization can be integrated with membrane filtration. This approach allows for the use (recovery) of water derived from the milk and eliminates the need for adding well water during the cheesemaking process (reduced water usage helps to improve the sustainability of the process). Over the past decade, milk powders with high casein contents (and reduced levels of whey protein) have grown in popularity and provide unique benefits in standardizing the protein contents for natural and process cheese manufacture. This symposium will highlight advances in analytical techniques such as next-generation genomic sequencing to track microbial changes during ripening and becoming a powerful tool in identifying spoilage organisms. The application of techniques from the material science field to study cheese performance and its conversion properties will also be covered.

This symposium showcases various emerging technologies and analytical techniques that can be used to help make high-quality, innovative cheese products

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Rani Govindasamy-Lucey, Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research Use of membrane concentrates in cheesemaking
Rodrigo Ibáñez Alfaro, Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research Use of lactose standardization: A sustainability tool
Prafulla Salunke, South Dakota State University Use of high-casein powders in cheese
Gisèle LaPointe, University of Guelph Metagenomic insights into cheese ripening and spoilage
Prateek Sharma, Utah State University New instrumental techniques and approaches in understanding machinability of cheese
production, management, environment
ruminant nutrition
Revisiting Progress in Feed Efficiency: Its Role in Advancing Dairy Sustainability

Revisiting Progress in Feed Efficiency: Its Role in Advancing Dairy Sustainability

Feed costs are the major expenses in livestock production, comprising between 40 and 70% of the expenses in a dairy operation. In the last 15 years, there has been growing interest in improving the understanding of drivers of feed efficiency and the development of animal selection based on their efficiency in utilizing dietary nutrients so feed intake can be reduced without affecting productivity. Additionally, there has been further discussion on the intersection of selection for efficiency and reduction of methane emission and their role in the sustainability of the dairy community.

This symposium will focus on the latest advances in feed efficiency in dairy cattle and their significance in reducing nutrient losses and improving the economics of dairy management. It will also address the challenges associated with optimizing efficiency, minimizing emissions, and ensuring the well-being of cows and farmers to promote a sustainable dairy supply.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Mike VandeHaar, Michigan State University Phenotypic and genetic relationships between energy efficiency and protein efficiency among cows
Christine Baes, University of Guelph The Resilient Dairy Genome Project Synthesis—Overview of feed efficiency and methane emissions
Tim McAllister, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada The interplay of rumen microbiome and host modulating feed efficiency and carbon emission in cattle
Andre Brito, University of New Hampshire The role of production systems in feed efficiency and carbon emissions
ruminant nutrition
physiology & endocrinology
lactation biology
Update on the Arterial-Venous Approach and Application to Current Unanswered Questions

Update on the Arterial-Venous Approach and Application to Current Unanswered Questions

Arterial-venous (AV) sampling is a powerful approach to understanding tissue metabolism but is technically challenging. Multiple investigators with decades of experience are recently retired or nearing retirement, making it very timely to have them summarize what they learned from their approaches and provide advice for future applications. There are currently also a number of labs exploring the technique.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Hélène Lapierre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada What mammary AV has taught us about mammary protein metabolism
Chris Reynolds, University of Reading What splanchnic AV taught us about GI physiology and future opportunities
Mark Hanigan, Virginia Tech Modeling AV data: Benefits and opportunities
John Cant, University of Guelph New opportunities in understanding energy and protein efficiency using AV

 

Monday Lunch

workshop
ADSA GSD
Style Your Science with a Graphical Abstract

Style Your Science with a Graphical Abstract

Dairy scientists nowadays are using novel tools to communicate their science to scientists outside their area of expertise and the general public. One of these tools is a graphical abstract, which is a digital representation of your paper's findings and is currently a requirement to publish in JDS Communications.

We'll be joined in this workshop by JDS Communications Editor in Chief Dr. Jess McArt and ADSA Communications Manager Jess Townsend about the tips and tricks in how you can help make your research visually appealing.

This will be a working lunch, so please be sure to bring one of your abstracts in either print or digital form as we learn about this digital tool to style your science!

 

Monday P.M.

dairy foods
interdisciplinary
ASN
human health
Dairy and Dairy Products on Human Health

Dairy and Dairy Products on Human Health

Joint symposium with the American Society of Nutrition (ASN)

Dairy foods have been an integral part of human diets for centuries, providing a rich source of essential nutrients that contribute to overall health and well-being. They also have been the subject of controversy and debate about their impact on human health. This session will explore the health effects of dairy foods

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Connie Weaver, San Diego State University The impact of the dairy matrix on health effects
Richard Bruno, The Ohio State University Whole-milk dairy and cardiometabolic disease
J. Bruce German, University of California, Davis Milk: The Rosetta Stone for health innovation
  Panel Discussion
ruminant nutrition
Integrating Statistics, Nutrition, and Economics - Recognizing the Contributions of ADSA Past President and Life Member Dr. Normand St-Pierre

Integrating Statistics, Nutrition, and Economics—Recognizing the Contributions of ADSA Past President and Life Member Dr. Normand St-Pierre

Improving our understanding of nutrition and economics is critical in dairy cattle. Norm St-Pierre, PhD, has widely contributed to this area with his research program. This symposium will address current knowledge and future challenges in integrating statistics, nutrition, and economics.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Jeff Firkins, The Ohio State University Welcome remarks and connecting nutrition and statistics
Rob Tempelman, Michigan State University Integrating quantitative data: Application to Dairy Sciences
Bill Weiss, The Ohio State University Feeds vary: Should we care?
Norm St-Pierre, The Ohio State University A random view of the world: Because we are never absolutely sure of anything
dairy foods
interdisciplinary
Precision Components from Grass to Glass

Precision Components from Grass to Glass

The impact of advancements in production and processing methods and technologies on major and minor milk components is poised to improve the efficiency, sustainability, and value proposition throughout the entire dairy system. Beyond fat, protein, and lactose, milk is a source of a host of bioactive compounds, including lactoferrin, milk fat globule membrane, immunoglobulins, and more that are being leveraged to improve outcomes for producers, processors, and consumers. This symposium will cover new research related to approaches to increasing desirable components at the farm and novel processes for capturing and purifying components in manufacturing.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Gulustan Ozturk, University of Wisconsin–Madison Toward the future of dairy foods: A processing perspective
Sebastian Arriola Apelo, University of Wisconsin–Madison Nutritional strategies to alter milk composition
Rafael Jiménez-Flores, The Ohio State University Milk fat globule membrane and intestinal health
Massimo Bionaz, Oregon State University Milk and its bioactive compounds and human health
breeding & genetics
Platform session: Deriving Novel Traits from Sensors and Other Technologies for Breeding Purposes

Platform session: Deriving Novel Traits from Sensors and Other Technologies for Breeding Purposes

Over the past decade, there has been an increase in the use of precision farming technologies in the dairy industry, including wearable sensors and other technologies such as milking robots, automated milk feeders, and cameras. These technologies generate a large amount of data that can be used for deriving novel traits to be potentially included in breeding programs. There is a growing number of abstracts on this topic submitted to ADSA; consequently, the goal of this platform session is to discuss the use of large-scale datasets generated by sensors and other technologies and their usefulness for refining dairy breeding programs.

James Koltes, Iowa State University, will give a platform keynote presentation on “Deriving novel traits based on data from sensors and other technologies.” Selected abstracts pertinent to the session theme will be presented after the keynote presentation.

dairy foods
human health
Platform session: DC44 Recap | Why Cheese from Milk?

Platform session: DC44 Recap | Why Cheese from Milk?

In collaboration with the American Cheese Society, ADSA held the 44th ADSA Discover® Conference on May 3 to 4, 2023, in Itasca, Illinois. The conference was designed to inform attendees of some of the latest research on the nutritional and health-promoting aspects of milk and cheese. The overarching goals of the conference were to provide attendees with (1) access to the latest science-based information from dairy science experts, (2) engagement with production and dairy foods colleagues in the cheese sector, and (3) access to evidence-based messaging about dairy.

The outcomes of the conference will be discussed in the keynote presentation from Rafael Jiménez-Flores of The Ohio State University. Selected abstracts pertinent to the session theme will be presented after the keynote presentation.

extension education
Platform session: Training Dairy Workforce - Industry Needs and Ongoing Initiatives

Platform session: Training Dairy Workforce—Industry Needs and Ongoing Initiatives

This session aims to provide an updated perspective on the educational demands within the dairy sector that should guide extension efforts. This information is crucial for addressing the sector’s evolving needs. We will also explore the essential frameworks that ensure innovative methods are not merely taught but consistently embraced and applied in daily farm management. Our discussions will focus on how extension approaches can effectively bridge the gap between learning and practical application, leading to enhanced efficiency and the promotion of sustainable practices in dairy farming.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Jennifer Heguy, University of California, Agriculture and Natural Resources Needs assessments to identify educational and outreach opportunities for dairy producers and employees
Luciana da Costa, The Ohio State School of Veterinary Medicine Framing extension strategies for facilitating the adoption of dairy farming practices

 

Tuesday A.M.

breeding & genetics
production, management, environment
EAAP
Breeding for Environmental Sustainability

Breeding for Environmental Sustainability

Joint symposium with the European Federation of Animal Science (EAAP)

Over the past few years, there have been major advancements in the development of large-scale phenotyping and multi-omics tools for improved environmental sustainability in dairy breeding programs. There is significant demand from society as a whole, breeding and academic organizations, as well as policymakers, to breed livestock for reduced environmental footprints. Therefore, in this symposium, we will focus on major environmental sustainability areas, including climatic resilience (heat tolerance), methane emissions, feed efficiency, and epigenomic strategies for evaluating the impact of the environment on quantitative trait expression. The suggested speakers have made substantial contributions in these fields, including the development of methods for evaluating heat tolerance based on routinely recorded data in dairy farms, genomic evaluations for feed efficiency and methane emissions in dairy cattle, and the development of a DNA methylation array.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Ignacy Misztal, University of Georgia Breeding for improved heat tolerance: methods, challenges, and progress
Asha Miles, USDA-ARS The value of a national evaluation system in promoting dairy sustainability
Bjørg Heringsta, Geno, Norway Strategies for breeding feed-efficient dairy cows with lower methane emissions
Hélène Jammes, INRAE – France Genomic and epigenomic strategies for dairy breeding sustainability
animal behavior & well-being
DCWC
Elevating Animal Comfort and Well-being Using the Five Domains

Elevating Animal Comfort and Well-Being Using the Five Domains

Joint symposium with the Dairy Cattle Welfare Council (DCWC)

Members of the ADSA Animal Behavior & Well-being Committee and the Dairy Cattle Welfare Council are excited to collaborate on a joint symposium. The format of the symposium will follow the Five Domains Framework, which was recently updated in 2020. The Five Freedoms are a commonly referenced framework in the animal welfare field, but what is less known is “The Five Domains” framework (1994), which funnels nutrition, environment, health, and behavior into the overall mental state of the animal. The “behavior” domain has been updated to “behavioral interactions,” because “animals consciously [seek] specific goals when interacting behaviorally” with their environment, other animals, and humans. Plenary speakers will introduce the framework, ways to apply it in practical settings, and research related to behavioral interactions. The final presentation will highlight U.S. Dairy's commitments to animal care. This collaborative symposium between DCWC and ADSA represents a significant step forward in addressing critical issues facing the dairy industry.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Temple Grandin, Colorado State University Explaining the Five Domains and using behavioral measures in commercial systems
Heather Neave, Purdue University Measuring minds: Understanding the mental states of dairy animals in different management conditions
Maria Camila Ceballos Betancourt, University of Calgary Importance of human-animal relationships and their influence on animal welfare and productivity
Chase DeCoite, Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy Demonstrating U.S. Dairy’s commitment to animal care
Emily Yeiser Stepp, National Dairy FARM Program, National Milk Producers Federation  
ruminant nutrition
physiology & endocrinology
Functional Nutrients

Functional Nutrients

Macro- and micronutrients have primarily been fed to production livestock animals to meet nutrient needs for physiological function. Recent research has demonstrated additional functional effects on production, health, and reproduction beyond their traditional roles. This symposium aims to consolidate both established and cutting-edge research and pinpoint future research prospects in functional nutrition for dairy cattle.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Adam Lock, Michigan State University Bioactive nutrients on animal performance
Alejandro Relling, The Ohio State University The impact of fatty acids as bioactive nutrients on the development of offspring
Anne Laarman, University of Alberta Bioactive nutrients’ role in gut development
José Eduardo P. Santos A case to be made for choline as a required nutrient for transition dairy cows.
dairy foods
Next Generation of Scientific Leaders in the Field of Dairy Foods Science

Next Generation of Scientific Leaders in the Field of Dairy Foods Science

It is crucial that the dairy science community offers robust support to emerging scholars and educators during their formative career phase. This commitment is pivotal to cultivating researchers who are not only confident and passionate but also proficient, ensuring a steady influx of talent into the dairy science field for the foreseeable future. The American Dairy Science Association’s Annual Meeting consistently attracts key figures, encompassing top funding agencies, academicians from global institutions, and other stakeholders. This symposium is designed as a launchpad for early-career academics, enabling them to present their groundbreaking research concepts. This initiative is poised to foster worldwide partnerships, ultimately propelling the dairy sector’s advancement.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Haotian Zheng, North Carolina State University Milk protein functionality: Colloidal and interfacial aspects
Grace Lewis, University of Wisconsin–River Falls Dairy components in pharmaceutical and value-added applications
Maneesha Mohan, South Dakota State University Sustainable process and healthy dairy product solutions
Prafulla Salunke, South Dakota State University Tailoring the dairy-based ingredient functionality
Carmen Licon-Cano, California Polytechnic State University Generating added-value dairy products: A West Coast perspective
Prateek Sharma, Utah State University Understanding the structure-function relationship in dairy food matrices
Rohit Kapoor, Dairy Management Inc. Harnessing research to boost innovation and develop future leaders, fueled by dairy farmers
reproduction
physiology & endocrinology
Physiology and Management of Previously Inseminated Cows: Approaches for Reinsemination

Physiology and Management of Previously Inseminated Cows: Approaches for Reinsemination

First-service programs have been studied extensively in recent years, whereas reinsemination strategies have not. Increasing the fertility to second and later services is still a challenge in dairy cows and represents a critical need for successful reproductive performance. New emerging technologies have facilitated the detection of nonpregnant animals; however, these need to be integrated with the physiological characteristics of previously inseminated cows that fail to establish a pregnancy. Consequently, the proposed symposium is directed at exploring recent advances and unmet needs related to the identification and management of cows that fail to establish or maintain a pregnancy after first insemination. Reviewing the efficacy and challenges of these technologies and the physiology of previously inseminated animals would help to develop new ideas and approaches for the incorporation of these technologies to increase fertility during second and later services in dairy cows as a means to maximize fertility and efficiency beyond first service.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Tony Bruinjé, University of Guelph In-line milk progesterone monitoring: Perspectives for the identification of nonpregnant cows
J. P. Andrade, University of Wisconsin–Madison Doppler ultrasonography for early pregnancy diagnosis: Opportunities and challenges
Julio Giordano, Cornell University Ovarian physiology of previously inseminated cows: Considerations for rebreeding
Paul Fricke, University of Wisconsin–Madison Management strategies for reinsemination: An integrative approach

 

Tuesday P.M.

dairy foods
human health
A Systems-Based Approach to Drive Innovation in Dairying

A Systems-Based Approach to Drive Innovation in Dairying

A comprehensive systems-based approach to fostering innovation within the dairy industry entails orchestrating the entire value chain as an intricately interconnected network of components, with each element playing a pivotal role in enhancing trust and bolstering sales. Embracing this holistic perspective empowers stakeholders within the dairy sector to discern innovation prospects that transcend mere aggregation. Dairy Management Inc. has spearheaded this groundbreaking systems-based approach to innovation. In this symposium, we will have the privilege of delving into the research initiatives supported by Dairy Management Inc. in various domains, including consumer insights, sustainability, nutrition, and product research. These endeavors promise to illuminate the cutting-edge developments and advancements driving the dairy industry forward.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Hari Meletharayil, Dairy Management Inc An introduction to Dairy Management Inc.’s research priorities
Kristiana Alexander, Dairy Management Inc Unlocking innovation opportunities for dairy in health and wellness
Francisco Peñagaricano, University of Wisconsin–Madison Innovative integrations: Genomic, milk spectrometry, and microbial manipulations to mitigate enteric methane emissions from dairy cattle
Daniel Moore, University of Toronto Anabolic potential of milk and dairy proteins compared with plant-based alternatives in active children and adolescents
Rohit Kapoor, Dairy Management Inc. Innovative pathways in scaling benchtop discoveries to health and wellness ingredients
Nicole Martin, Cornell University Existing and emerging microbial challenges in the dairy industry
interdisciplinary
dairy foods
production, management, environment
JDS
Application of Artificial Intelligence to Dairy Systems

Application of Artificial Intelligence to Dairy Systems

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) is becoming more frequent in animal agriculture and dairy is in the center of it. Join us as we explore how the use of new technologies are starting to affect US dairy system-wide. We will be exploring new tech in sensors and wearables, programs and algorithms built to assist in decision making in dairy farming such as precision feeding, precision ranching, etc., quality control in the dairy food supply chain, and how AI in research publications is changing the world of dairy research.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Miel Hostens, Cornell University Advancing precision dairy farming: Challenges and opportunities in data integration and methodological frameworks
Jeff Bewley, Holstein Association USA Smart cows, smart farms: Unleashing the potential of artificial intelligence in the dairy sector
Chenhao “Luke” Qian, Cornell University Opportunities of artificial intelligence in enhancing quality control of the dairy food supply chain
Robin White, Virginia Tech Generative artificial intelligence tools in journal article preparation: A preliminary catalog of ethical considerations, opportunities, and pitfalls
dairy foods
Dairy Foods: Milk Proteins and Enzyme Symposium: Casein Structure and Chemistry

Dairy Foods: Milk Proteins and Enzyme Symposium: Casein Structure and Chemistry

Caseins, as the most abundant proteins in bovine milk, have been the subject of extensive studies for several decades because of their importance to the functionality of milk and dairy products as well as their digestibility and nutritional value. With the improvements in experimental techniques for characterizing various aspects of caseins, our understanding of casein structure and structure-function relationship has evolved, enabling design of a wide range of dairy products with specific sensory, functional, and nutritional properties. The aim of this symposium is to provide an update on the topic of casein structure and chemistry.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Milena Corredig, Aarhus University Casein micelle structure and processing functionality
Diarmuid Sheehan, Teagasc Caseins: The structure-function relationship in cheese
John Lucey, University of Wisconsin Animal-free caseins: Challenges in recreating casein micelles and related functional properties
Federico Harte, Pennsylvania State University Tearing down casein micelles: An alternative clean-label ingredient approach
ruminant nutrition
production, management, environment
breeding & genetics
Platform session: Challenges and Opportunities for the Impactful Implementation of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies

Platform session: Challenges and Opportunities for the Impactful Implementation of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies

This platform session will discuss the importance of strategies to enhance feed and production efficiency while minimizing greenhouse gas emissions.

Jan Lassen of Aarhus University will give a platform keynote presentation, “Breeding strategies to reduce methane emission.” Selected abstracts pertinent to the session theme will be presented after the keynote presentation.

breeding & genetics
reproduction
animal health
ruminant nutrition
production, management, environment
Platform session: DC45 Recap | Dairy Cattle Lifespan: New Perspectives

Platform session: DC45 Recap | Dairy Cattle Lifespan: New Perspectives

The length of dairy cow life is a topic with many facets and current pertinent questions. Dairy cows complete, on average, fewer than three lactations before they are culled in the US, but productive lifespans in other developed dairy countries may be substantially longer. Extended productive life is said to be good for sustainability and the image of the dairy sector. Culling and replacement are the result of the availability of heifers and the relative performance of cows in a herd, such as health, reproduction, and milk production. Aging and husbandry, including nutrition and breeding, affect health and performance. With the availability of sexed semen and increasing reproductive efficiency, dairy farmers can make many more heifers than they need. Economic decision-making plays an important role in how long dairy cattle live. However, when cows should be replaced and what replacement rates should be remain open-ended questions, despite advances in husbandry, precision dairy farming technologies, and decision support.

The 45th ADSA Discover® Conference, held October 23 to 26, 2023, in Itasca, Illinois, focused on scientific advancements, questions, and new perspectives on the important topic of dairy cattle’s productive lifespan. Compared with the previous Discover Conference on cow culling in 2004, new factors such as sexed semen, genomic testing, beef-on-dairy, increased milk production and health, and sustainability warrant a fresh look at the topic of dairy cattle lifespan.

Join the DC45 co-chairs, Albert DeVries (University of Florida) and Matthew Lucy (University of Missouri), as they recap the 45th Discover® Conference presentations and discussions. Selected abstracts pertinent to the conference program themes and topics will be presented after the keynote presentations.

teaching
Platform session: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 101: Demystifying Using the Classroom for Research

Platform session: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 101: Demystifying Using the Classroom for Research

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, otherwise known as SoTL, is a field of academic inquiry and practice that focuses on researching, studying, and improving the effectiveness of teaching and learning in higher education. It involves educators systematically examining their teaching methods, student learning outcomes, and classroom practices to generate new knowledge and insights.

This session will provide attendees with the background information needed to understand what SoTL is and the basics on what is required to be able to properly carry out SoTL in the classroom. Novel research and teaching strategies designed to increase student interest, motivation, and academic performance within dairy science classrooms will also be highlighted.

Jillian Fain Bohlen (University of Georgia) and Liz Karcher (Purdue University) will lead the SoTL discussion.

 

Wednesday All Day

dairy foods
interdisciplinary
human health
production, management, environment
ADSA Dairy Foods Division International Partnership Program (IPP) Symposium: Dairy Research in Denmark - Focus on Sustainability and Functionality (full day; ADDITIONAL FEE REQUIRED)

ADSA Dairy Foods Division International Partnership Program (IPP) Symposium: Dairy Research in Denmark—Focus on Sustainability and Functionality (full day; ADDITIONAL FEE REQUIRED)

A one-day symposium on structural nutrition will be presented by researchers from two universities in Denmark: the University of Copenhagen and Aarhus University, as well as two leading dairy companies in Denmark: Chr. Hansen and Arla Foods. The symposium will provide examples of the broad-reaching research activities supporting the dairy sector in Denmark. From studies on sustainability and milk protein quality, to protein structure function relationships, fundamental studies on protein ingredients and processing, dairy food and health, and digital dairy.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Lars Wiking, Aarhus University Healthier milk-fat fractions through cow feeding and processing
Nina Aagaard Poulsen, Aarhus University Sustainable dairy: What milk can tell us about methane-mitigating strategies
Joana Ortega Anaya, Arla Foods How research and innovation turn into dairy products in your home
Vojislav Vojinovic, Chr. Hansen Exopolysaccharide-producing lactic acid bacteria and texture properties
Søren Bang Nielsen, Arla Foods Modification of beta-lactoglobulin for enhanced functionality
Hanne Christine S. Bertram, Aarhus University The dairy matrix and calcium bioavailability
Lilia Ahrné, University of Copenhagen Future cheeses by extrusion
Behnaz Razi Parjikolaei, Arla Foods The way we are looking at protein fractionation
animal health
lactation biology
growth & development health
human health
AAVI
Colostrum – The Role it Plays in Calf Health, Development, and Future Productivity

Colostrum—The Role it Plays in Calf Health, Development, and Future Productivity

Joint symposium with the American Association of Veterinary Immunologists (AAVI)

Calf health, survival, and future productivity are almost completely dependent upon the consumption of adequate high-quality, clean colostrum quickly enough after birth. The passive transfer of maternal immunoglobulins (Ig) from colostrum across the small intestine within the first 24 hours of life helps protect calves against pathogens until their immune systems become fully functional. Although the benefits of Ig are universally recognized, the methodologies that should be executed to optimize Ig content in colostrum are not. Moreover, the value of colostrum far exceeds Ig alone. Colostrum is also a rich source of hormones, minerals, growth factors, cytokines, functional leukocytes, fat, lactose, nonspecific antimicrobial factors, microRNAs, vitamins, and oligosaccharides. These nutrients and bioactive compounds participate in a variety of biological responses in calves that are yet to be fully elucidated. Understanding their role in modifying immune responses, regulating gastrointestinal tract development and function, and the epigenetic programming or imprinting of neonates can help improve calf welfare through better health, growth, and development. Additionally, bovine colostrum has been used for hundreds of years as a traditional or complementary therapy for numerous human health ailments. There is an increasing body of evidence that it may be of value for the treatment of medical conditions in both adults and infants including exercise-induced increases in intestinal permeability, short bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, chemotherapy-induced mucositis, infectious diarrhea, and more.

This symposium will provide the opportunity to share the latest information from this active area of research as well as stimulate future research directives and initiate new concepts as many groups throughout the world focus on the area of colostrum and its role in supporting overall well-being in animal agriculture. This symposium will also provide a discussion forum for all ADSA members as well as identify take-home messages and actionable ideas for on-farm implementation by dairy nutritional consultants, veterinarians, and producers.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Craig Baumrucker, Pennsylvania State University The regulation of colostrogenesis
Amelia Woolums, Mississippi State University Optimizing passive immunity with dam vaccination: When is too soon or too late? What is too much?
Koryn Hare, University of Saskatchewan The impact of prepartum nutrition on colostrum production and newborn calves
Sabine Mann, Cornell University Colostrum—More than IgG: Colostrum components and effects on the calf
Lautaro Rostoll Cangiano, University of Wisconsin–Madison The role of colostrum in programming immune development of dairy calves
Dave Renaud, University of Guelph What can’t colostrum do? Exploring the effects of colostrum after day one of life
Joe Pierre, University of Wisconsin The utility of whole colostrum and components in maintaining gut health and metabolism

 

Wednesday A.M.

physiology & endocrinology
Peripheral Nervous System Regulation of Homeostasis

Peripheral Nervous System Regulation of Homeostasis

The peripheral nervous system is essential for regulating blood flow, metabolic flux, and normal physiological function, and responds to internal and external stimuli to maintain homeostasis. This session is aimed at understanding the factors that affect milk production.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Rachel Meyer, University of Arizona Impact of postprandial butyrate production on hepatic glucose production via colonic and hepatic signaling pathways.
Andrea Zsombok, Tulane University Sympathetic circuits regulating hepatic glucose production
Heather M. White, University of Wisconsin–Madison Fueling milk production carbon by carbon: Regulation of hepatic glucose production.
reproduction
animal health
forages & pastures
production, management, environment
Southern Branch
Seasonality in the Dairy Production System

Seasonality in the Dairy Production System

The seasonal effects on production, reproduction, and health of dairy cattle are apparent. These effects are mediated by factors such as heat stress, photoperiod, or forage availability. Understanding seasonality in the dairy production system will help dairy producers implement the best management strategies at different times of the year.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Marina Danes, Federal University of Lavras, Brazil Seasonality of milk production and composition
Peter Hansen, University of Florida Seasonality of the reproduction
Izabella Toledo, University of Florida Seasonality of herd health
Michael Dineen, Teagasc Challenges and opportunities in seasonal grazing

 

Wednesday P.M.

ruminant nutrition
Advances in Analytical Procedures Affecting Dairy Nutritionists

Advances in Analytical Procedures Affecting Dairy Nutritionists

Recent research highlights an increasing dependence on commercial analytical laboratories for feed analysis in academic studies. These commercial labs possess comprehensive nutrient-composition datasets for diverse feeds, enabling researchers to analyze relationships among nutrients in specific feedstuffs, regional variations, and local trends.

This symposium aims to enhance collaboration between commercial and research laboratories, fostering a platform for experts, researchers, and nutritionists to converge, exchange knowledge, and explore future prospects.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Ralph Ward, Cumberland Valley Analytical Services Forage and feed laboratory focus to support industry advancement.
David McIntosh, NIRS Consortium Use of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict nutrient composition and digestibility of feed
Mary Beth Hall, USDA Impact of alternative methods on measurement of NDF compared to the official method
Mike Van Amburgh, Cornell University Impact of laboratory carbohydrate digestibility methods on nutrition models
Nicole Schlau, Dairyland Laboratories Inc. Panel Discussion: Improving collaboration between academia and industry in labs
breeding & genetics
production, management, environment
small ruminants
Genomic Strategies for Alternative Dairy Production Systems

Genomic Strategies for Alternative Dairy Production Systems

The worldwide dairy industry is very diverse, but the vast majority of ADSA genetics symposia have focused primarily on challenges and advancements in intensive Holstein cattle breeding. However, many other dairy cattle breeds and dairy species (e.g., sheep and goats) are of great relevance to dairy production. Furthermore, in addition to the conventional intensive production systems, there is an increased interest in alternative breeding schemes, including organic production systems, beef-on-dairy, other crossbreeding schemes, and diversification of species used for milk production. These alternative breeding strategies require refinement of breeding goals and selection tools. In this symposium, we will discuss examples of alternative dairy breeding systems in cattle and other dairy species. We will provide perspectives from the US beef industry for beef-on-dairy, examples of crossbreeding schemes, and the implementation of genomic selection in dairy sheep and goats in Europe.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Hélène Larroque, INRAE – France Implementation of genomic selection in French dairy sheep and goats and opportunities for sustainable animal breeding
Isaac Haagen, University of Minnesota Defining breeding goals for improved sustainability in organic production systems
Kelli Retallick, American Angus Association Angus Genetics: Providing crossbreeding solutions for the dairy industry
Brad Heins, University of Minnesota Crossbreeding dairy cattle for improved production and profitability
reproduction
animal health
Improving Pregnancy Survival in Dairy Cows: Challenges and Opportunities

Improving Pregnancy Survival in Dairy Cows: Challenges and Opportunities

The dairy industry relies heavily on the reproductive success of lactating dairy cows to maintain profitable milk production. However, the physiological demands of lactation can adversely affect the reproductive performance of these cows, leading to reduced pregnancy survival rates. Solving and addressing the challenges associated with pregnancy loss was one of the topics identified as of critical relevance at the last ADSA Discover® conference on reproduction. This symposium will provide the opportunity to discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with enhancing pregnancy survival in dairy cows. Specifically, the symposium will discuss physiological aspects regarding the dichotomy between pregnancy survival and loss, and the use of reproductive management strategies to overcome losses and thus enhance pregnancy survival when using both artificial insemination and embryo transfer.

Speaker, Affiliation Presentation Title
Milo Wiltbank, University of Wisconsin–Madison The dichotomy between pregnancy survival and loss: Challenging preconceived notions
Richard Pursley, Michigan State University Physiological and management considerations for pregnancy survival after insemination
Pietro Baruselli, University of Sao Paulo Pregnancy loss in embryo transfer recipients: Risk factors and mitigation strategies

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