GSD Webinars

GSD Webinar Series

Future webinars are currently being planned, but in the meantime, you can watch any of the previous webinars

Improving scientific communication: a perspective from the outside looking in

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The goal of this webinar is to learn ways to improve scientific communication, whether that be to the general public or to other scientists.

Dr. Harris is an advocate for making scientific communication clear and engaging. She earned a PhD in microbiology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 2020. She currently works as the Manager of Engagement and Communications for the company Xontogeny. In this role, she works with life sciences startup companies to manage their communication strategies with stockholders and increase their value. She also advocates for mental health and is the founder of PhD Balance which is a community space for academics to connect and share their experiences, as well as for providing them resources.

The cows are talking- can you hear? Using precision dairy technologies to improve the management, health and welfare of dairy cattle

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This webinar will focus on previous research with wearables, milk sensors and automatic calf feeders conducted at the University of Minnesota’s West Central Research Center in Morris, Minnesota. Topics include, validation of technologies for pasture-based herds, evaluation of estrus detection, using rumen temperature to measure heat stress, rearing calves on automatic calf feeders and precision dairy technologies benefits and pitfalls.

Glenda Pereira is a PhD candidate at the University of Minnesota, where she focuses on dairy cattle management specifically with crossbred dairy cattle in grazing and confined systems. Originally from the Azores, Glenda plans to return there to open a creamery on her family’s dairy farm and continue to help dairy producers find ways to best manage their cattle. Having previously served as secretary and communications chair for GSD, Glenda has a passion for communicating her research. Her favorite pastimes are reading, hiking and spending time with family and her cat when she is not writing manuscripts.

Brad Heins is an Associate Professor of Dairy Management at the University of Minnesota's West Central Research Center in Morris, Minnesota. The Center has a 130-head herd in a certified organic system, and a 160-head herd in a conventional grazing system. His research and extension program focus on best management practices for dairy production, crossbreeding of dairy cattle, health and fertility and survival of Holsteins and crossbreds, group rearing of calves, and renewable energy for dairy production systems. He also evaluates the genetics of health and productivity of Holsteins and crossbreds at the research center. He serves on the Minnesota Institute for Sustainable Agriculture Board of Directors and the Minnesota Organic Advisory Task Force.

An introduction to R: Opening the door to a friendly and useful software package

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After a brief discussion about statistics, I will introduce R. I will demonstrate how to download this open source software and then walk through a couple of quick statistics examples. I will finish with a note about some of the advanced functionality of R.

Bio:
Dr. Scott Merrill is a Research Assistant Professor in the Plant and Soil Science Department at the University of Vermont and Managing Director of the Social Ecological Gaming and Simulation (SEGS) lab. He is a systems ecologist with research spanning a wide range of both natural ecosystems and social-ecological systems. Projects include examining dynamics of change within pest-crop agroecosystems including aspects of climate change, examining ways to nudge human behavior to help protect the health of our livestock herds, and looking at factors motivating behavior that affects water quality in the Lake Champlain watershed. In the SEGS lab, he uses experimental gaming as a novel technique for collecting data to examine decision making in social-ecological systems. An important goal of this work is the creation of applicable and predictive models to inform best management practices.

Job Title:
Research Assistant Professor

Organization(s):
Department of Plant and Soil Science
Managing Director. Social Ecological Gaming and Simulation Lab
Gund Fellow, Gund Institute for Environment
University of Vermont

Consumer Behaviour and the impact of COVID19 – considerations for the dairy industry

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Anne Goldman, CFS, FIFT
Vice President Consumer Research
ACCE International
2575B Dunwin Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5L 3N9
Canada

Webinar summary
COVID19 has impacted the consumer in many ways and in particular with respect to their sourcing, preparation and consumption of foods & beverages. Anne will discuss the changes that have resulted and that may have an impact for the future from her perspective as a consumer sensory researcher. She will address the implications that this has for the dairy industry.

A food science graduate of the Universities of London and Leeds, Anne began her professional career in the UK food industry followed by research positions with DSIR, Fonterra and Massey University in New Zealand and an Assistant Professorship at the University of Guelph, Canada. Anne is most proud of the fact that she has been a principle of ACCE International, a Canadian consumer sensory research company that she helped found over 30 years ago. Her company helps businesses chart their way to finding the most appealing products for their target consumers.

Anne is an IFT Fellow, a Certified Food Scientist and she was honoured with IFT’s 2016 Sensory and Consumer Sciences Achievement Award for her lifelong contribution of actively supporting and advancing the sensory and consumer research field. She is also a Fellow of CIFST, IFST, IAFoST and MRIA and a recipient of the Honorary David R. Peryam Award for applied sensory science.

Anne divides her time between Ontario, Canada and Queenstown, New Zealand.

Contact details
agoldman@acceintl.com
https://www.linkedin.com/in/anne-goldman-3a86837/

The Principles and Practices of Food Systems Research

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John P McNamara
President, Washington Science Teachers Association
Emeritus Professor of Animal Sciences
WSU Teaching Academy
Fellow, American Dairy Science Association
Fellow, American Society of Animal Sciences

Brief Description of Webinar
"An interactive, fun and factual look at systems biology in animal agriculture, how we got here, where we are going and why we must change our experimental approach."

Job Title
Professor Emeritus of Animal Sciences, WSU. Fellow, American Dairy Science Association; Fellow, American Society of Animal Sciences; President, Washington Science Teachers Association.

Organization(s)
Washington State University, Washington Science Teachers Association

Born in a little farm town of Chicago, he realized milking cows and feeding pigs was more interesting then selling groceries. Later he realized that doing research on cows and pigs was a lot easier than milking and feeding them. That led to a BS in Agricultural Sciences (1976) and an MS in Dairy Sciences (1978) at University of Illinois. But the best part of that experience was meeting his love, Sue, to whom he has been married for 44 years.

Following a PhD as the first graduate of the new Foods & Nutrition Program at University of GA (1982), he did a post doctorate in Dairy Sciences at University of FL, and then accepted a job in the hidden town of Pullman WA and has now been retired from Washington State University for 4 years.

He had the great opportunity to work with Bob Collier, Dale Bauman, Jimmy Clark, Carl Davis, Bruce Larson, Janice Bahr and others at the University of Illinois, where he learned that biology included everything in life, not just one part; the value of studying the literature before you devise hypotheses; designing experiments for the most clear and relevant answers, and being sure the experimental design matched the hypotheses, and that the statistical analyses matched the experimental design. He also learned how to be a team player and a good faculty member, and that being a good scientist, teacher and a nice person were not mutually exclusive.

At UI, he also learned the hard way how important it was to be a good teacher, taking the graduate level Ag Statistics class, from the ‘guy who wrote the book’; and whose teaching method was ‘turn on the overhead, start writing and talking to the overhead, turn off the overhead and leave.’ No eye contact, no interaction. But we did teach ourselves statistics very well.

It was also a room of about 120 white men. So, 40 years later, in the same building, while receiving the Award of Merit from the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and being inducted into the Round Barn Society, he could talk to the room of 120 young people of all genders, ethnicities, points of view and state ‘we are (we being the 5 old white guys getting the rewards) the past, and you are the future!’

Continuing on the quest of learning the interaction of biology and statistics, he had the glory of crashing the entire UGA computer system with a SAS ANOVA for 3 diets, 6 animals per diet, 6 post-harvest nutrient concentrations in incubations in 3 tissues and 3 reps per concentration. Remember, this was 1981 on a mainframe with punch cards.

At WSU, he had the good fortune of working with a geneticist Joe Hillers, with whom he was able to make some of the first discoveries of the metabolic controls which made the most efficient cows. Later, he was able to ‘end’ the research thread with the largest data set (to that time) on mRNA expression in the adipose tissue of dairy cattle. Among his discoveries were the uncoupling of lipolysis and lipogenesis in later lactation, which was the first explanation of why cows in later lactation are the most efficient animals. Their studies in early lactation defined the differences in control of metabolic pathways due to genetic selection and how that interacted with energy intake to ensure rapid rates of milk production, energy intake and adipose metabolism.

All of these experiments included explicitly genetics (genetic merit of milk production of the bulls) and energy intake in the model, as well as repeated studies over time and in many experiments, tissue culture, enzyme activity and later, mRNA expression. No experimental model had fewer than 6 to 8 interactions and most used continuous rather than categorial variables, as metabolism is continuous. To put that in perspective, the biochemical model of Baldwin et al that Dr. McNamara studied for 30 + years has over 100 equations with more than 17000 variables, in an attempt to explain the cow, which has more than 3000 metabolic reactions occurring in several organs, every day and 3000 relevant genes expressed. So, let us not say that an experiment with 6 to 8 interactions is too complex.

In addition to driving himself crazy studying cows, he also did the same thing in sows to discover the interactions of energy and amino acid metabolism in lactating sows. He helped build the only mechanistic model of metabolism in pregnant and lactating sows.

And, just because he was one of the few who realized that student’s and society’s interest in companion animals far exceeded its interest in farm animals, and that pets were not only economically important, but a key part of human development and behavior; he started one of the first senior level Companion Animal Courses, and an early course in Pet Nutrition, which was taught as a WSU University General Education Course, which means it could serve as the only biology course several students would take. His successful text, Principles of Companion Animal Nutrition has been used across the country and some other countries and is now in a new (3rd) edition, all on-line interactive text with Great River Learning.

In recognition of his scientific and educational work, Dr. McNamara earned the1990 WSU College of Agriculture Young Scientist Award, the 1992 ADSA Young Scientist Award, the 2001 Washington Science Teachers Association Higher Education Teacher of the Year; the 2007 Corbin Award in Companion Animal Biology (Dr. Corbin was one of his teachers at UI in the 70’s); The College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resources Excellence in Advising Award (2005); and received the first WSU Excellence in Advising Award (2016). He was elected to the WSU President’s Teaching Academy in 2007. He was elected as a Fellow of ADSA in 2012; earned the 2015 Zoetis Animal Physiology Award and was elected a Fellow of ASAS in 2016. He is one of only 11 people who were elected as Fellows of both ADSA and ASAS.

Learning and Applying Statistics: What Could Go Wrong?

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Dr. Nick Serão
Assistant Professor, Animal Breeding & Genetics
Iowa State University
https://faculty.sites.iastate.edu/serao/

Nick Serão is an Assistant Professor of Animal Breeding & Genetics at Iowa State University. He holds BSc (Animal Science, 2007) and MSc (Breeding and Genetics, 2009) degrees from the Federal University of Viçosa, Brazil and a PhD degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Animal Science, 2012). Nick started his faculty career at NC State University in 2015, and in 2017 he joined Iowa State University. With over 60 peer-reviewed articles, over 140 scientific abstracts, and over $3.2 million in grants and in-kind support, Nick has established an original and highly productive research program in genetics, genomics, and statistics. His research program is focused on animal health (e.g., PRRS in pigs), reproduction in sows and boars, novel traits and Big Data (e.g., microbiome and RNA-seq), and statistical methods for genomic analyses, analysis of animal science research, and graduate education. Nick teaches statistics to graduate students at ISU and serves as statistics consultant for academic and industry collaborators.

Personal Perspective on Carrier Paths After Grad School

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The Do's and Don'ts to Effective Scientific Posters and Presentations

Overcoming challenges faced in the dairy industry

Careers in Organic and Sustainable Agriculture

Insights into Job Interviews and Negotiating Job Offers

How to Get Your Research Noticed Beyond the Journal of Dairy Science

Creating an Online Presence: Communicating Effectively for Career Development

Show Your Best Self: Techniques to Introduce Yourself in Informal Business Settings

Casein Micelles Structure-Function Properties: Opportunities and Challenges

Academic Research in Dairy Science: A Career for Me?

What a Difference a Name Makes! A Discussion of Misbranded Imitation Dairy Products

Organic Milk: Is it Worth the Price?

Pioneers in Dairy Science Webinar Series

Future webinars are currently being planned, but in the meantime, you can watch any of the previous webinars

Driving Miss Dairy: The Role of Consumer Emotions in Milk Choice and Consumption Behaviors

Nutritional Regulation of Gastrointestinal Development of the Calf

The DUMPS Story: Serendipity in Dairy Science

Observations During a Career in Teaching and Research

US Dairy Industry: Yesterday - Today - Tomorrow

Interaction of Climate and Dairy Cow Biology: Historical, Current, and Future Trends

Bovine Somatotropin: Regulating Nutrient Use to Improve Productive Efficiency and Reduce Carbon Footprint

Future of the Dairy Industry: Looking Back to Look Ahead

Pasture-based Dairy Research: The Past, Present and Future

Dairy-Related Careers: Specialist to Generalist

Seventy Years of Research in Dairy Foods

Dealing with Infertility of Lactating Dairy Cows the "Foster Mothers of the Human Race"

Key Aspects of Applied Calf Nutrition

Pioneer paper: Value-added components derived from whey – Wayne Modler
Rumen Microbiology: Where are we and how did we get here? – Milt Allison

ADSA Graduate Student Division Dairy Tales

Jam 2014

JAM 2013

2013 JAM ADSA/ASAS Graduate Student Symposium

How to Communicate Science Successfully Using Media Outlets